Upright Moral Character (Makarim al-Akhlaq) – Shaykkh Ibn Uthaymeen – Abu Muhammad al Maghribee [Audio|En]

Upright Moral Character Book Study – Upright Moral Character by Ibn Uthaymeen
Abu Muhammad al-Maghribee (hafidhahullaah)

This lecture was given on Friday May 18, 2012 at Masjid at-Tawheed in Stone Mountain, GA.

Today we begin studying from the book مكارم الأخلاق Makarim al-Akhlaq (Upright Moral Character) by our noble Sheikh Muhammad bin Saaleh al-Uthaymeen, rahimahullah. This was originally a talk that the Sheikh gave to the youth in a summer camp regarding good manners.

You may find the original arabic text of the book on the Sheikh’s website at:
http://www.ibnothaimeen.com/all/index/makaremalakhlaq.pdf

This is a topic of great importance, so please take the time to listen and benefit, in shaa Allah.

Part 01: We begin with a few stories from the life of our Sheikh, rahimahullah, and then with the introduction and the text of the book.

Listen / Download mp3: (Time 01:11:48)

Part 02 : Listen / Download Mp3 Here (Time 01:01:11)

Part 03 : Listen / Download Mp3 Here (Time 01:15:10)

Part 04 : Listen / Download Mp3 Here (Time 01:16:19)

Part 05 : Listen / Download Mp3 Here (Time 01:11:11)

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Good Manners when Dealing with the Creation – Shaikh Muhammad bin Saalih Al-‘Uthaimeen

Bismillaah, wal-hamdulilaah, was-salaatu was-salaamu ‘alaa rasoolillaah,
as Salaamu ‘Alaykum wa Rahmatullaahi wa Barakaatuh

Good Manners when Dealing with the Creation
by  Shaikh Muhammad bin Saalih Al-‘Uthaimeen
Makaarim-ul- Akhlaaq (pg. 23-31) – Al-Ibaanah.com

As for having good manners with the creation, then some of them have defined it as withholding abuse, extending kindness and having a cheerful countenance. This has been mentioned as a saying of Al-Hasan Al-Basree, may Allaah have mercy on him. [1]

First: The Meaning of Withholding Abuse:

What is meant by withholding abuse is that a person refrains from harming others whether financially, spiritually or socially (i.e. by harming his reputation). So whoever does not withhold from harming the creation, he does not possess good manners. On the contrary, he is ill-mannered.

The Messenger proclaimed the prohibition of harming a Muslim through any means of abuse. He did this during the greatest of gatherings in which he congregated with his ummah, saying: Indeed, your blood (i.e. lives), your wealth and your honor are sacred for you just like the sanctity of this day of yours in this month of yours in this land of yours. [2]

If a man transgresses against people by taking their wealth or by committing fraud or by deceiving them or by hitting them and committing a crime against them or by reviling, backbiting or slandering them, such a person is not good-mannered towards people. This is since he has not refrained from harming others.

And the sin of this becomes even greater every time his bad manners are directed towards someone who has a bigger right over you. So maltreatment of your parents, for example, is worse than you treating anyone else bad. Maltreatment of your relatives is worse than you treating strangers bad. And maltreatment of your neighbors is worse than treating those who are not your neighbors bad. This is why the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said: “By Allaah, he does not believe! By Allaah, he does not believe! By Allaah, he does not believe!” They (i.e. the Companions) said: Who O Messenger of Allaah?” He said: “He whose neighbor is not safe from his calamities.” [3]

Second: The Meaning of Extending Kindness:

The word nadaa (kindness) means generosity and courtesy, i.e. to extend one’s generosity and courtesy to others. Generosity does not mean what some people think it to be, which is giving money only. Rather, generosity can also be by way of giving one’s self, offering one’s status (to assist), donating one’s wealth and spreading one’s knowledge.

If we see an individual taking care of the people’s needs by helping them, directing their affairs to those who are not able to reach them, spreading his knowledge amongst the people and donating his wealth to them, can we describe this man as having good manners? Yes, we can say he has good manners because he has extended kindness and generosity. This is why the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said: Fear Allaah wherever you may be, and follow up an evil deed with a good deed, (for) it will wipe it out. And treat the people with good manners.” [4]

What falls under treating the people with good manners is: If you are oppressed and maltreated by someone, you should pardon and forgive that person. Allaah has praised those who pardon others, as He says about the inhabitants of Paradise: Those who spend (in Allaah’s Cause) during times of prosperity and adversity, who repress anger and who pardon people. Verily, Allaah loves the good-doers.” [Surah Aali ‘Imraan: 134]

And Allaah says: And to forego is closer to piety (Taqwaa).” [Surah Al-Baqarah: 237]

And He says: And let them pardon and forgive.” [Surah An-Noor: 22]

And He says: So whoever forgives and makes reconciliation, his reward is with Allaah.” [Surah Ash-Shooraa: 40]

A person is in constant contact with people, so he will most definitely encounter some bad treatment from people. But his stance with regard to this bad treatment should be that of pardoning and overlooking. And he should know for certain that by pardoning, overlooking, and responding with good, the animosity that exists between him and his brother will transform to amicability, love and friendship. Allaah says: The good deed and the evil deed are not equal. Repel (the evil) with that which is better, then behold, the one between whom he and you there was enmity (will become) as though he were a close friend.” [Surah Fussilat: 34]

Those of you who have knowledge of the Arabic language should reflect on how the end-result is derived here via the abrupt mention of “idhaa” (which means “then behold” here). The abrupt mention of this word indicates that the result (at the end of the ayah) will come to pass immediately, and that is: “then behold, the one between whom he and you there was enmity (will become) as though he were a close friend.”

However, not everyone is granted this same result. This is why Allaah says: But none are granted it except those who are patient. And none are granted it except those who possess a great portion (of moral character).” [Surah Fussilat: 35]

Do we understand from this that pardoning a criminal is praiseworthy in the absolute sense and that it is something that we were ordered to do? Some people have come up with this understanding based on this verse. However, it should be known that pardoning should only be commended if forgiving is the best and most advisable option. However, if retribution is the best option then doing that is better. This is why Allaah says: The recompense for an evil is an evil the like thereof. But whoever forgives and makes reconciliation, his reward is with Allaah. Verily, He likes not the wrongdoers.” [Surah Ash-Shooraa: 40] So here Allaah has linked forgiveness with reconciliation.

So it is possible that forgiveness may not necessarily mean reconciliation. For example, it could be that this individual who committed a crime against you and was insolent towards you is an evil man who is known for being evil and corrupt, and so if you were to forgive him, he would persist in his evil and mischief. In this situation, it is better that this man is punished for his crime since there is reconciliation in this.Shaikh-ul-Islaam Ibn Taimiyyah said: “Reconciliation is obligatory whereas forgiveness is optional. So in the event that forgiveness will cause reconciliation to be bypassed, this means that we have given precedence to something optional over something obligatory. And the religious legislation did not come to institute this.” And he has spoken truthfully, may Allaah have mercy on him.

An Important Note:

I would like to take this opportunity to point out something that many people do today with the intention of being good and sympathetic. And it is that when a person gets into an accident and as a result another person dies, the guardians of the deceased come and revoke the blood-money that is owed by this offender that committed the accident. So is their canceling of the blood-money praiseworthy and considered as being from good manners or does this issue have more detail to it?

There is more detail required on this issue. We must reflect and ponder on the condition of this offender who has caused this accident. Is he from among those people who are known to be careless and inconsiderate? Does he fall into the type of people that say: “I don’t care if I run over somebody on the road because I already have his blood-money prepared inside my desk” and we seek refuge in Allaah!

Or is he someone who has fallen into an accident even though he employed complete discretion and complete poise and balance, but in spite of this Allaah had already decreed all things to come to pass?

If he falls under the second category of people, then forgiving him is better. However, even if he does fall under this second category of prudent and well-poised people, before we forgive him, we must look to see if the victim has any debt he owes.

If the victim owes a debt, we cannot forgive the offender. And had we already pardoned the offender, the pardon would be dismissed. This is an issue that perhaps many people are unaware of. We say this because the heirs will assume entitlement of this blood-money from the victim that was killed in an accident, and their entitlement will not be satisfied until they pay back the deceased’s debt if he owed someone money.

This is why when Allaah mentions inheritance, He says: (The distribution in all cases is) after the payment of legacies he may have bequeathed or a debt (he owes). [Surah An-Nisaa: 11]

The point is that forgiving people is part of good manners and it falls under the realm of extending kindness to others. This is since extending kindness can either be in the form of giving something or in the form of revoking something, and pardoning falls under revoking something.

Third: A Cheerful Countenance:

Having a cheerful countenance means that your face is radiant and illuminated when you come in contact with other human beings. The opposite of this is to appear with a gloomy face. This is why the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said: Do not think little of any good deed, even if it is encountering your brother with a cheerful face.” [5]

A poet put this understanding into a verse, saying:

“My son, indeed piety can be something so trivial,
as a cheerful face and a soft-spoken tongue.”

So a cheerful face allows happiness to enter into people; it brings out love and amiability; and it causes the heart to expand – both yours and those you encounter.

On the other hand, if you always appear upset, people will run away from you. They will not be happy sitting with you or talking to you. Perhaps you may even be afflicted with psychological problems. You may be suffering from a dangerous disease known as stress. If so, then being happy and having a cheerful face is from the most effective treatments one can use to combat this disease. This is why doctors advise those who are afflicted with this illness to keep away from those things that cause them to be instigated and angered since that will only cause their sickness to grow.

So being happy and having a cheerful face causes this disease to be exterminated. And as a result of these two characteristics, a person will become loved by the people and dear to them.

These are the three foundations that good manners when dealing with the creation revolve around.

Also from the signs of good manners towards creation is:

That a person observes good relations with those friends and relatives that he is contact with. He should not be bothered by them nor should he inconvenience them. On the contrary, he should cause happiness to go into their hearts according to the extent that he is able to, within the confines of Allaah’s Legislation. This restriction is absolutely necessary since there are some people who cannot be made happy except with things that are disobedience to Allaah, and we seek refuge in Allaah! So we should not consent with him in this. However, causing happiness and joy to enter into those you keep ties with whether they are your family members, friends or relatives according to the limits of the Religion is part of having good manners. This is why the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said: The best of you are those who are the best towards their family. And I am the best of you towards my family. [6]

Many people, unfortunately, display good manners in front of people yet they do not behave in the same manner towards their family. This is extremely wrong and the opposite of how things should be. How can you have good manners in front of strangers yet bad manners in front of your own family?

Someone may say: Because I take care of them and support them! We respond by saying: This is not something that should cause you to display bad manners towards them. Your family members and relatives have the most right out of all people that you should be good-mannered towards them when accompanying and spending time with them. This is why when a man once asked the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam): “O Messenger of Allaah, who has the most right amongst people of my good companionship” , he (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) replied: “Your mother.” The man said: “Then who?” He replied: “Your mother.” The man said: “Then who?” He replied: “Your mother.” The man said: “Then who?” He replied: “Your father.” [7]

In spite of this, some people behave contrary to this. So you will find him having a bad relationship with his mother while having a good relationship with his wife. So he gives having good ties with his wife precedence (over having good ties with his mother) whereas the status of his wife before him is like that of a captive. The Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said: Take care of the women for indeed they are like captives before you.” [8]

In summary: Keeping good relations with family, friends and relatives is all part of having good manners.

Footnotes:

[1] See al-Adaab-ush- Shar’eeyah (2/216); There are also other definitions for good manners such as the definition of Al-Waasitee, where he said: “It is when one does not argue due to his complete awareness of Allaah. It is also said it means the relinquishment of immoral characteristics and the adornment of virtuous characteristics. It is also said that it means offering the good while withholding the vile. Sahl was once asked about it so he replied: ‘The lowest form of it is showing, tolerance, lack of retribution and mercy towards the wrongdoer, while asking Allaah to forgive him and showing sympathy towards him.'” [Refer to Madaarij-us- Saalikeen of Ibn Al-Qayyim (2/294), Ihyaa ‘Uloom-id-Deen of Abu Haamid Al-Ghazaalee (3/53) and al-Adaab-ush- Shar’eeyah (2/216)]

[2] Reported by Al-Bukhaaree (no. 67, 1741 & 4406) and Muslim (no. 29 & 30)

[3] Reported by Al-Bukhaaree (no. 6016) and by Muslim (no. 73) with the wording: “He whose neighbor is not safe from his calamities will not enter Paradise.”

[4] Reported by At-Tirmidhee (no. 1987) who said it was “hasan saheeh” and Ahmad in al-Musnad (4/153, 158 & 236) from Abu Dharr and Mu’aadh bin Jabal, may Allaah be pleased with them. It is also found in Saheeh al-Jaami’-us- Sagheer (no. 97)

[5] Reported by Muslim (no. 144) and in extended form by At-Tirmidhee (no. 1833)

[6] Reported by At-Tirmidhee (no. 3895) and Ibn Hibbaan in his Saheeh (no. 1312 of al-Mawaarid) from the narration of ‘Aa’ishah, may Allaah be pleased with her; It is found in Saheeh al-Jaami’-us- Sagheer (no. 3314); It was also reported by Ibn Maajah (no. 1977) from the narration of Ibn ‘Abbaas (radyAllaahu ‘anhu).

[7] Reported by Al-Bukhaaree (no. 5971), Muslim (no. 201) and Ibn Maajah (no. 2706)

[8] Reported by At-Tirmidhee (no. 3087) who said it was “hasan saheeh”

Published on: May 20, 2007

The Status of Manners in Islaam – Abu Muhammad al-Maghribee (mp3/english)

Friday Khutbah – The Status of Manners in Islaam
Abu Muhammad al-Maghribee (hafidhahullaah)
http://followthesalaf.com
(mp3/english)

This khutbah was given on Friday, May 18, 2012 at Masjid at-Tawheed, Stone Mountain, GA.

The khutbah is regarding the Importance of Correct Islamic Manners and is a prelude to the lecture series “Upright Moral Character” that followed over the next several days.

Listen / Download mp3:

 

Beware of your Character, O Muslim! – Shaykh Muhammad Ramzaan Al-Haajiree

Shaykh Muhammad Ramzaan Al-Haajiree‘s -hafidhahullaah- lecture entitled
‘The rights of the Ulama’: Imam Malik conference, Agadir, Morocco 1432

Translated by: Abu Afnan Muhammad Siddiq (hafidhahullaah)

Read the article: http://www.athaar.org/files/tazkiyyah/ramzan_character.pdf
Copyright Maktabat Ahlil Athaar

Warning mankind about the issue of standing up (for others) – Shaikh Al-Albaanee

Source: Fataawaa of Shaikh Al-Albaanee [Al-Asaalah, Issue #20]

The Messenger of Allaah, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, said: “Whoever loves that the people appear before him standing (up for him), then let him find his seat in the Hellfire.” Reported by Al-Bukhaaree in Al-Adab-ul-Mufrad (977) and others

It occurs from the path of Habeeb Ibn Ash-Shaheed on the authority of Abu Mujliz, who said: “Mu’awiyah entered a house in which was ‘Abdullaah Ibn Az-Zubair and ‘Abdullaah Ibn ‘Aamir. So Ibn ‘Aamir stood up while Ibn Az-Zubair remained seated – and he was the one with the most experience of the two. So Mu’awiyah, radyAllaahu ‘anhumaa, said: “Sit O Ibn ‘Aamir for I heard the Messenger of Allaah, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, say: [and he mentioned the hadeeth]. At-Tirmidhee said: “It is a hasan hadeeth.” I say: Rather, it is a saheeh hadeeth.

Al-Mukhlis said in (his book) Al-Fawaa’id:
‘Abdullaah narrated to us: Dawood reported to us: Marwaan reported to us, Mugheerah Ibn Muslim As-Siraaj reported on the authority of ‘Abdullaah Ibn Buraidah that he said: “Mu’awiyah went outside (one day) and saw that they were standing up because he was going out. So he said to them: Sit for the Messenger of Allaah, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, said: ‘Whoever is pleased that the Children of Adam (mankind) stand up for him, Hellfire becomes binding upon him.'”

This hadeeth has an authentic chain of narration.
Shabaaba Ibn Siwaar followed up the same hadeeth except that he reported “Whoever loves that men gather around him standing (up for him)…” and the rest is the same.

Reported by At-Tahaawee (2/38/39) and Al-Khateeb in Taareekh Baghdaad (13/193). And the hadeeth has another supporting evidence with Al-Khateeb (11/361) in mursal form concerning a road story. He reported it from ‘Abd-ur-Razzaaq Ibn Sulaimaan Ibn ‘Alee Ibn Al-Ja’ad who said: I heard my father say:

“Once Al-Ma’moon (the Khaleefah at that time) went to visit the jewelers in the market place. So he haggled with them on the price of an object that they had. Then Al-Ma’moon embarked on completing some of his needs. Then he left, so everyone that was in that gathering stood up for him except for Ibn Al-Ja’ad, for he did not stand. So Al-Ma’moon looked at him with an expression of anger. Then he took him to the side and said: ‘O Shaikh, what prevented you from standing up for me as your companions stand up for me?’ So he (‘Alee Ibn Al-Ja’ad) said: ‘I honor the Ameer Al-Mu’mineen too much (to stand up for him) because of the hadeeth that we report from the Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.’ He said: ‘What is it?’ “Alee Ibn Al-Ja’ad said: ‘I heard Al-Mubaraak Ibn Fudaalah say: I heard Al-Hasan say: the Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, said…[then he mentioned the hadeeth with the first wording]. So Al-Ma’moon lowered his head pondering over the hadeeth. Then he raised his head and said: ‘No one should buy except from this Shaikh.’ So the people bought only from that Shaikh on that day till he had the amount of thirty thousand deenaars.”

So Allaah’s saying:
“And whoever fears Allaah, he will make a way out for him (i.e. from difficulty), and he will provide for him from places he never imagined” became a reality for ‘Alee Ibn Al-Ja’ad, the reliable and trustworthy reporter.

Ad-Dainooree reported a similar story to this in Al-Muntaqaa min Al-Majaalisah: Ahmad Ibn ‘Alee Al-Basree narrated to us saying:

“Al-Mutawakkil (the Khaleefah at that time) turned his attention to Ahmad Ibn Al-Mu’adhal and other scholars and so he gathered them in his home. Then he came out to them, so all of the people there stood up for him except Ahmad Ibn Al-Mu’adhal. So Al-Mutawakkil said to ‘Ubaidullaah. ‘This man does not agree with swearing allegiance to us (bay’ah).’ So he (‘Ubaidullaah) said to him: ‘Yes O Ameer Al-Mu’mineen, but he appears to have bad eyesight.’ So Ahmad Ibn Al-Mu’adhal said: ‘O Ameer Al-Mu’mineen, I do not have any defect in my eyesight. But rather I removed you from the punishment of Allaah, the Most Exalted, for the Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, said: ‘Whosoever loves that men present themselves to him standing (up for him), then let him find his seat in the Hellfire.’ So Al-Mutawakkil went to sit down beside him.”

Ibn ‘Asaakir reported in Taareekh Dimashq (19/170/2) with his chain of narration to Al-Awzaa’ee:
Some of the guards of ‘Umar Ibn ‘Abd-il-‘Azeez (the Khaleefah) narrated to me saying:

“‘Umar Ibn ‘Abd-il-‘Azeez came out one day while we were waiting for him on the day of Jumu’ah. So when we saw him, we stood up. So he said: ‘When you see me do not stand up but instead spread out (to make way for passing).'”

The Fiqh (understanding) of the Hadeeth: This hadeeth indicates two matters to us:

First: The prohibition of someone loving that people stand up for him when he enters. And this evidence is clear such that there is no need for it to be clarified.

Second: The disapproval of those sitting to stand up for the one who is entering, even if he doesn’t have a love for people standing up for him. This falls under the aspect of helping one another in goodness and avoiding opening the door to evil. And that is an accurate understanding that has been indicated to us by the narrator of the hadeeth, Mu’awiyah, radyAllaahu ‘anhumaa, when he refused that ‘Abdullaah Ibn ‘Aamir stand up for him, and he used this hadeeth as evidence for what he said. He did this because of his understanding and knowledge of the Religion and it’s legal principles, which include “preventing the means”, and because of his awareness of the natural dispositions of humans and their reactions to good and evil factors.

And if you were to imagine a community like the community of the first predecessors, they never practiced the custom of standing up for one another. It would be very rare that you find among them anyone that loved this kind of standing, which can throw someone into the Hellfire. And this was due to the lack of there being present that thing which would remind one about it – and it is the standing itself. On the other hand, if you were to look at a society like our society today, they have taken this particular type of standing as a normal custom. Indeed, this practice, particularly when done repeatedly, constantly reminds the person. So then the person’s soul desires it and finds pleasure in it until he ends up loving it. So when he loves it, he becomes ruined. So it becomes from the aspect of helping one another towards righteousness and Taqwaa to abandon doing this standing, even to those whom we feel don’t have a love for it, out of fear that our standing up for him will bring him to love it, for then we would be assisting him in bringing destruction to his soul and this is not permissible. Among the proofs that bear witness to this is when you see some of the people of knowledge of whom it is thought have good manners, their souls change when their eyes fall upon an individual that does not stand up for them. This is if they don’t become angry with him and attribute him with having little manners and give him the tidings of being prevented form the blessing of knowledge due to his lack of showing respect for its people, according to their claim.

Rather, there is even among them he who calls others to stand, deceiving them with such sayings as “You do not stand up for me for the sake of a body of flesh and bones, but rather you only stand up for the knowledge that is contained in my chest!!” As if the Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘ alayhi wa sallam, did not have knowledge in his!! For the Companions did not used to stand up for him. Or is it that the Companions did not used to give him the respect that was befitting of him! So can a Muslim honestly say this or the other?!

And due to this hadeeth and others beside it, a group of scholars have taken the opinion that it is prohibited to stand up for another person, as is stated in Al-Fath (4/14). Then he (Ibn Hajr) said: “The outcome of what has been reported on Maalik is the forbiddance of standing for the length of time that the one who is being stood up for doesn’t sit., even if he is busy serving himself. For he (Maalik) was asked about the woman who goes to great extents in hosting her husband, by receiving him, taking off his (outer) garments and standing until he sits? So he responded: ‘As for her receiving him, then there is nothing wrong with this. But as for her standing until he sits down, then no, for this is from the acts of the tyrants. And ‘Umar Ibn ‘Abd-il-‘Azeez forbade this.”

I say: There is nothing in this subject that presents a contradiction to the evidence found in this hadeeth at all. And those who oppose and hold the opinion that it is permissible to stand, rather that it is recommended, they use as evidence ahaadeeth, some of which are authentic and some of which are weak. But all of them, when one reflects on their chains of narration and texts do not present a contradiction to the evidences for that (prohibition).

And what further confirms and clarifies this is the Prophet’s dislike of people standing up for him:

“There was no individual in the world that was more beloved to them than the Messenger of Allaah, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam. And when they would see him, they would not stand up for him due to what they knew of his dislike for that.”

Reported by Al-Bukhaaree in Al-Adab-ul-Mufrad (946), At-Tirmidhee (2/125), At-Tahaawee in Mushkil-ul-Athaar (2/39), Ahmad (3/132), and Abu Ya’laa in his Musnad (2/183) and the wording is from him. It is from the path of Humaid on Anas, radyAllaahu ‘anhu. And At-Tirmidhee said: “It is a hasan saheeh hadeeth, ghareeb from this perspective.” I say its chain of narration is authentic according to the standards of Muslim.

This hadeeth strengthens what the previous hadeeth has indicated from the forbiddance of standing out of respect and honor. This is since if standing up were a legislated form of showing respect, it would not be permitted for him sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam to make it disliked for his Companions. And he, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, is the most deserving of people to be shown respect and honor. And they, radyAllaahu ‘anhum, were the most aware of people of what he, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, deserved.

Also, the Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, hated this standing up for him to be done by his Companions. So therefore, it is upon the Muslims – especially if they are from the people of knowledge and exemplary figures – that they should hate that for themselves, in accordance with following his, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, way. And they should hate that for those Muslims beside themselves due to his saying: “None of you truly believes untill he loves for his brother what he loves for himself from good.” So no one should stand up for him nor should he stand up for anyone. Rather their hatred for this standing should be greater than that of the Prophet’s hatred (for it). This is since if they do not hate it, it will become a normal practice for some of them to stand up for others. And that will lead them to hold a love for it, which then will serve as a cause for which they will be deserving of the Hellfire, as is stated in the previous hadeeth. And Allaah’s Messenger sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam was not like this, for he was free and protected from having any love for this act of disobedience. So if he also hated it along with that, it becomes clear that it is more fitting that the Muslim hate it. [30]

The Prophet, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, has gathered the comprehensive and abundant good manners in his saying: “He is not from us who doesn’t have mercy for our young, and respects our old and knows the right of our scholar.” [31]

So knowing the right of the scholar requires having good manners with him in his presence as well as in his absence. However, this does not require that one should worship him, as is the case with some of the Sufis and the extremists among the shaikhs. An example of this is standing up for the scholar when he enters the gathering. This act is not befitting for the pure and uncorrupted Islaamic society. So the main concern of the true Islaamic callers is to bring back as close as possible the first Islaamic society, in which it was not possible to adopt a practice any way they felt like. So indeed the matter is only as the famous saying goes: “So imitate them if you are not like them, Verily, imitation of the righteous is success.”

So we are trying to imitate those righteous and good individuals (from the Salaf), and we are attempting to bring forth a society that resembles that first luminous society that existed in that radiant time. So our attention must always be directed towards doing what they used to do, as much as we are able to, for the reality is as his, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, saying indicates: “Whatever I command you to do, then do as much of it as you are able. And what I forbid you from, then stay away from it.”32 So the matters related to actions are restricted and thus additions to them are not accepted. An example of that is being kind to the scholar by outward gestures, such as by standing up for him or others when they enter one of the gatherings. And I do not say the gatherings of knowledge, for this is very clear – that the students in that situation should not stand up for this scholar. However, if he enters a gathering that is not a gathering of knowledge, is it from the beneficial knowledge and from the righteous deeds that the people of that gathering stand up for that scholar who has entered the gathering?

Answer: “So imitate them if you are not like them.” Who is the only single individual that we should imitate apart from others? He is, as we all know, Muhammad the Messenger of Allaah. And the people of knowledge know, and this is something that they do not differ about.

Nowadays, the whole Islaamic world – except for those whom Allaah has mercy on – is in opposition to the Prophet’s guidance of the past concerning this matter. So the people of knowledge do not forbid their companions nor the general people when one of them enters a gathering and they stand up for him. And those who stand up for him out of kindness and respect, they deem that this is how the first society (of the Companions) were. Therefore, it is upon us to constantly direct the attention towards physically imitating the (way of this) first society.

These are from the matters of which it is obligatory upon the scholars, rather upon the students of knowledge, to take concern of. This is since if you are truthful in your imitation of the Messenger, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, then spread amongst your companions the fact that you hate this outward expression. This means to humble yourself as the Messenger, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, used to humble himself. The Messenger, sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam, used to hate this standing and so the people accepted it, for in reality he hated this thing. So if the scholar is following the example of the Messenger then let him spread that amongst his companions. This comes first.

Second, it falls into the realm of “preventing the means.” For instance, if the scholar makes it a normal habit for the people to stand up for him, his soul will yearn for this standing. Then there will come a time when he will see his student who loves him and is devoted to him. He used to stand up for him then all of a sudden he stopped standing up for him. So there will occur disputes, then blaming, then perhaps more than that between the scholar and the student. This is because this scholar made it a normal habit for himself to love this standing. So what brought him to fall into this hated and forbidden love was the people’s accustoming him to it. I also wanted to remind the scholar and the students of knowledge to not adapt the societies because this adapting (and conforming) has no fixed limits today, for an innovation may appear and we will say: “There is something more important than it.” And then tomorrow there will be another innovation and we will say what we said in the first instance, until the society has gone far away from acting in accordance with what Islaam has brought, due to these distortions and false justifications.

[30] Silsilat Al-Ahadeeth As-Saheehah (no. 358)
[31] Saheeh Al-Jaami’-us-Sagheer (no. 5443)
[32] Agreed upon

[Al-Asaalah, Issue #20]

The do’s and don’ts of shaking hands – Shaykh Albanee

Source: silsilat ul-ahaadeeth is-saheeha – the series of authentic narrations –hadeeth no. 16

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On the authority of Abu Huraira: “when the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) used to say farewell to someone, he [sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam] would say:

أَسْتَوْدِعُ اللهَ دِينَكَ وَأَمَانَتَكَ وَخَوَاتِيمَ عَمَلِكَ
(I entrust your religion, your family and belongings (that you are leaving behind), and the last of your deeds to Allaah).”

Shaykh al-Albaani (rahimahullaah) comments:

“A number of benefits are gained from this authentic hadeeth. First: the permissibility of saying farewell with the mentioned saying in it:

أَسْتَوْدِعُ اللهَ دِينَكَ وَأَمَانَتَكَ وَخَوَاتِيمَ عَمَلِكَ,’ and the traveler responds to him and says:‘أَسْتَوْدِعُكُمُ اللهَ الَّذِي لاَ تَضِيعُ وَدَائِعُهُ’ (I entrust you to Allaah, whose trusts are not lost).[1]Refer to ‘Al-Kalim At-Tayyib.’[2]

Second: (the permissibility of) taking hold of one hand during handshaking, which has been mentioned in many narrations, and this hadeeth indicates the derivation of this word (‘handshaking’) in the (Arabic) language. According toLisaan ul-‘Arab:[3] ‘al-musaafaha (handshaking) is taking hold of the hand, the same as at-tasaafuh. A man handshakes another man when he places the side of his palm in the side of the other’s palm, and the sides of their palms are the front of them – like the hadeeth of handshaking upon meeting, which is done with one another by joining the side of a palm with another palm and turning face-to-face.’ I (Shaykh al-Albaani) say: there is that which reports this meaning as well in some of the previously mentioned narrations, such as the marfoo’ hadeeth[4] ofHudhaifa: ‘Indeed, if the believer meets another believer, then gives him thesalaam and takes hold of his hand and handshakes him, their sins fall off as the leaves of trees fall off.’[5] Al-Mundhuri said: ‘At-Tabaraani narrated it in ‘Al-Awsat’ and I don’t know of anyone who was criticized among its narrators.’ I (Shaykh al-Albaani) say: it has evidences by which it rises to the rank of being authentic, such as (that which was reported) on the authority of Anas by Ad-Dhiyaa Al-Maqdisee in ‘Al-Mukhtaara,’ which al-Mundhuri attributed to Ahmadand others. So all these narrations indicate that the sunnah in handshaking is taking hold of one hand; therefore, the handshaking with both hands that some of the scholars do is against the Sunnah, so let this be known.

The third benefit: that handshaking is legislated at the time of parting as well… The reason for inferring, rather quoting (this) becomes clear by remembering the permissibility of (giving) the salaam when parting as well due to his (the Prophet’s) saying (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam): ‘If one of you enters the gathering then let him give the salaam, and if he leaves then let him give thesalaam, as the first one is not more deserving (to be said) than the other one,’[6]Abu Daawood, at-Tirmidhi and others narrated it with a hasan (good) chain of narration. So the saying of some (people) is that handshaking at the time of parting is an innovation which has no truth. Yes, indeed the one who reads the mentioned narrations about handshaking when meeting will find them to be more in number and stronger than the mentioned narrations about handshaking when parting; and the one who is intelligent will conclude from that, that the permissibility of the second handshaking is not like that of the first (handshaking) in rank. Therefore, the first one is sunnah and the second one is recommended. As for (the latter) being an innovation, then no (this is not true) due to the evidence that we mentioned.

And as for handshaking immediately after the prayers, then it is undoubtedly an innovation, except if (the handshaking) takes place between two persons who have not met before that, then it is sunnah as you learned.”


[1] Saheeh Al-Kalim at-Tayyib #133
[2] The Goodly Words by Shaykh Ibn Taimiya
[3] The Arab Tongue; one of the well-known Arabic dictionaries
[4] a narration attributed to the Prophet (sallAllaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam)
[5] Silsilat ul-Ahaadeeth is-Saheeha #526
[6] Saheeh Abi Daawood #5208, Saheeh at-Tirmidhi #2706

~

asaheeha translations

From the Etiquette of a Son with his Father – Al-Bukhari, Al-Adab Al-Mufrad

Abû Hurayrah – Allâh be pleased with him – once saw two men. He asked one of them, “How is this man related to you?” He replied, “He is my father.” Abû Hurayrah said,

“Do not call him by his name, do not walk in front of him and do not sit before he does.”

Al-Bukhârî, Al-Adab Al-Mufrad. Shaykh Al-Albânî graded its chain of transmission sahîh in Sahîh Al-Adab Al-Mufrad Vol. 1 p19.

Source: http://www.sayingsofthesalaf.net/index.php/tag/abu-hurayrah/

An Example of Shaykh Ibnul-’Uthaymeen’s Beautiful Manners in Giving Da’wah

Bismillaah, wal-hamdulilaah, was-salaatu was-salaamu ‘alaa rasoolillaah, wa ba’d

An Example of Shaykh Ibnul-’Uthaymeen’s Beautiful Manners in Giving Da’wah

Doctor Saud al-‘Ajaaji who was amongst those who accompanied Shaykh al-‘Uthaymeen on the last medical trip he made to Boston (a city in America) said,

“Whilst we were leaving the hotel where we were staying in, a little American boy who was with his mother stood in front of him – the Shaykh caught his attention because of his Saudi thawb and abayah – so he began to touch him on his head and to play with him. So his mother asked him to greet the Shaykh and he returned an even better greeting. Then the Shaykh said directing his speech to the mother ‘May Allaah guide you to Islaam’ all during which he kept lowering his gaze. Then the mother told her son to bid the Shaykh farewell by saying to her son, ‘Tell him have a nice day.’ So the Shaykh asked me what he said, I told him he said ‘Have a nice day.’ However some of those who were accompanying him became annoyed because of the way in which the woman was dressed. One of them even made some remarks towards her, but the Shaykh did not like this and he said, ‘O brothers this is not from the mannerisms of Islaam, the mother and he son were smiling at us and they were very cordial in speech, so it is upon us to reciprocate the favour. So rather then make du’aa against them, we should make du’aa for her which by the way is the path of this exalted religion.’”

(an-Nur Magazine: nos. 191)

Me, Myself and I – Imam Ibn Al Qayyim (rahimahullaah)

Shaykh ul –Islaam Ibn Al Qayyim as-Salafi -Rahimullaah-
From his book ‘Za’ad al-Ma’aad’
Translated by Abbas Abu Yahya

Ibn al-Qayyim said:

‘Every Muslim should be warned of the oppression of:  ‘I – My/Mine – I Possess’

Indeed these three words are what Iblees (Shaytan), Fir’awn and Qaroon were tried with.

  • Iblees said: ‘I am better than him’
  • Fir’awn said: ‘Is not mine the Kingdom of Egypt,’
  • Qaroon said: ‘This has been given to me only because of knowledge I possess.’

So regarding the saying of the Slave of Allaah ‘I’ – then the best that he can be described with is:

  • I am a slave who sins, makes mistakes, seeks forgiveness and recognizes this.

So regarding the saying of ‘My/Mine’ – and those statements similar to that is:

  • My sins, my crimes, my humbleness, my depravation and submissiveness.

So regarding the saying of ‘I Possess’:

  • Forgive me for my mistakes and what I do intentionally, in jest, or in seriousness and I possess all these shortcomings.

[Taken from ‘Za’ad al-Ma’aad’ 2/475 – By Ibn al-Qayyim al-Jawzeeyah]

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